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New York Dad says Mom hacked his financial docs off the Internet

A child support dispute can get ugly. Often, the parent with custody of the children will claim the other parent is lying about his or her finances to get out of paying as much support as he or she can afford. For their part, the non-custodial parent may accuse his or her ex of trying to unfairly squeeze him or her financially.

Much of the evidence of a person’s wealth can now be found online or on his or her computer. If you are not careful, your sensitive data could be compromised by hackers. This is what a New York man is accusing his former wife of, allegedly in order to obtain more information about his finances.

According to a lawsuit filed by the father, when the court recently increased his child support obligation from $2,000 a month to nearly $3,000, the judge relied on documents provided by the mother. The father says that his ex-wife obtained those financial papers, including his investment portfolio and will, by hacking into his Google account and downloading them onto a thumb drive.

Besides increasing his child support by nearly 50 percent, the court ordered the father to pay most of the kids’ health insurance premiums and one child’s private school tuition.

The lawsuit seems to state that the ex-wife broke the law by hacking into his accounts. An article on the case by the New York Post does not mention why the parents could not work out a settlement to this issue, but the lawsuit and its allegations imply that the former spouses cannot negotiate in good faith.